Oct 162016
 

There are a few subjects that strike fear in the hearts of homeschoolers. Advanced math and high school science are a couple that are usually on the list. But there’s another equally scary subject and that’s…

FOREIGN LANGUAGE!

Why is foreign language so scary? The simple fact is that most of us in the US are not bilingual. And it’s really hard to teach something that you don’t know. So by necessity most homeschoolers either look for someone else to teach their students a foreign language, choose a foreign language that isn’t spoken like Latin, or choose a foreign language curriculum that teaches directly to the student with little parent/teacher involvement.

When I was approached by Speekee to review their Accelerate Spanish program for homeschools, I jumped at the opportunity because I’m one of those typical Americans who isn’t bilingual. I’m also stretched for time, so I’m always happy to find educational opportunities that don’t require much input from me. Speekee provided me with 1 year of free access to the program in exchange for my honest review.

Speekee Accelerate Homeschool Spanish

The Facts

Speekee Accelerate is a video-based Spanish curriculum designed for students ages 8 and up. In addition to short videos, Speekee Accelerate includes worksheets, audio clips, and activity ideas for additional instruction. Each of the 40 weekly lessons is divided into 4 parts. On day 1, students watch the entire video (about 15 minutes). This video is completely in Spanish, spoken by native Spanish speaking children. There is very little explanation in the video, rather it immerses the student in the language. For the next 7 lessons, various sections of the video are watched again with emphasis placed on a different topic that was covered in the video like numbers, colors, greetings, etc. There is also an option to receive a weekly e-mail with activities and links for each lesson.

Speekee Accelerate Homeschool Spanish Screen Shot

A peek at the lesson interface

My Opinion

The video lessons are quality productions. We did not particularly entertaining, but these are not designed to be entertaining.  The videos allow the student to hear the language spoken. They have kept the dialogue to a minimum. I think that makes them not as overwhelming as watching a regular television program in Spanish. (We do find it interesting to do that occasionally, just to hear the language, but we could definitely not learn Spanish that way.) It’s really not possible to create a very exciting storyline with limited Spanish vocabulary.

I love the fact that the lessons are short. It makes it much easier to fit into our busy days. The weekly e-mail is a fantastic idea and the activity ideas are extra helpful and add some fun to the program.

Speekee Accelerate is a great way to add elementary Spanish instruction into our homeschool day.

Speekee Accelerate Homeschool Spanish Sample Worksheet

A sample worksheet

The Cost

Speekee is a monthly subscription product. You pay just $7.50/month for access to 4 different learning products. In addition to Accelerate, there is Speekee Fast Track for ages 4-7 and Speekee TV which I previously reviewed here. Speekee Play is an on-line game to reinforce and learn more Spanish. If you’re unsure about Speekee, they offer a 2 week free trial and you can cancel your monthly membership at any time.

If you’re looking for an easy way to add some elementary Spanish to your day, I recommend that you try Speekee.

 

Sep 102016
 

We have finished 3 weeks of homeschool for this new school year: my 14th year of homeschooling and I’m still a homeschool curriculum junkie. Have I really been homeschooling that long? Many of my homeschool curriculum choices this year are back to my old favorites.

My oldest son has started college and is living 3 hours away from home. He is doing great! And I am doing better than I expected. It’s definitely been an adjustment though. I took the leaf out of the table this week and can’t get used to how small it looks now.

Below are what I’ve chosen as our homeschool curriculum this year. Please note that I do use affiliate links to help pay for maintaing this blog.

11th grade

My oldest daughter, Anna, is in the 11th grade. This year we have loaded her up with classes outside the home. She is in 2 different co-ops: 1 meets twice per week and the other once per week. We found last year that outside deadlines and accountability to someone other than me are a great thing for her. So we loaded her up!

She’s taking:

Pre-calculus taught by an instructor, but using Teaching Textbooks.

US Government and Economics with the Notgrass materials

World Literature

Art

Health and Nutrition

Physics (Apologia Physics with labs done together in co-op)

So far, it’s going well for her. She has her driver’s license (or I would be going batty!)

Homeschool Curriculum Mess

8th grade

My son William is in 8th grade this year. He has been my struggling learner, but I am really encouraged with his progress this year. He remembered his math concepts over the summer which thrilled me!

He’s using:

Christian Light Math 7 – He has been using this program for several years. We finally found a math program with the right amount of review for him!

All About Spelling – He’s finishing up the last level of AAS this year! It has been a fantastic program for him.

Memorize Galatians – I really love the material from Brookdale House. He is doing great working through the book of Galatians. He will be memorizing the entire book using this program!


Story of the World 2
– ? – Yes, he’s a little old for this, but he does better with audiobooks, so I want to get him a good base for history before high school. He will listen through the series.

Around the World Geography – He is taking this class at a weekly co-op. There has been some homework and projects to do at home and present to the rest of the class.

General Science – I’m still not sure what I’m doing with this. He is taking a general science lab at a weekly co-op (his first experience and I’m happy to report it’s going well.) I pulled out the Apologia General Science book and I just can’t see him making it through the reading. He likes science though, so we may continue the way we have been and allow him to study science topics as he is interested.

5th grade

Lizzie is my 5th grader. She is a bright student and sometimes hard to keep occupied.

She’s learning from:

Singapore Math 5A and 5B – this has been my favorite elementary math program since I started it with my now college student. I love the emphasis on word problems and mathematical understanding.

Latin – She’s finishing up First Form Latin and will start Second Form Latin probably after Christmas.

Classical Composition Fable – I bought this for her last year, but we didn’t make time to do it. I pulled it out again this year and it’s going well. She loves to write and embellish the fables with her own details.

All About Spelling 5 – I love how simple this program is to use. Just pick up the book and go.

Considering God’s Creation and Apologia Elementary Science books – We’re using Considering God’s Creation loosely as a springboard into more in-depth study using the Apologia elementary books. I like the lapbooky aspects of Considering God’s Creation, but I wouldn’t recommend it as a stand alone science program.

Tapestry of Grace Year 2 – I am trying out Tapestry of Grace again. We used it for several years when my oldest 2 were upper elementary to middle school. I had to put it aside because the discussion aspect of the program just wasn’t working for us as a family. The reason I loved the program so much was to have the whole family on the same “page” in history. It was just not a good fit for my oldest. But I felt a nudging toward it again, so I decided to see if we can use it with my 2 younger children. So far we’ve completed the first 2 weeks and it’s going ok. I am feeling a little flustered trying to keep up with everything.

Kindergarten

Miquon Math Homeschool Curriculum

My baby, Andrew, has started Kindergarten! We are keeping things really light for him and using some old favorites.

Alpha Phonics – This is just simple, no non-sense reading instruction


Handwriting without Tears
– Seriously. No tears. He loves it!

Miquon Math – He’s starting with the orange book. He loves to use the Cuisenaire rods.

Verbal Math – This is something new that I’m trying. I like the way it teaches math without writing the problems down.

So far, everything is running relatively smoothly though I do constantly feel pulled in a thousand directions. I should be an expert by now, but I still make mistakes and struggle to get everything done!

 

 

 

Aug 032016
 

Compass Classroom recently released a new modern history class entitled Modernity, and they gave me the opportunity to preview the course. Covering a wide range of topics from modern history including the Enlightenment, Napoleon, the Industrial Revolution, and the World Wars, the high school level class consists of 27 weekly lessons. Each lesson includes 5 video segments with instructor Dave Raymond that are approximately 20 minutes long.

Along with the video, there are accompanying reading assignments available in Kindle, pdf, and epub formats. In addition to the lecture and reading, the student works on a portfolio and several projects over the course of the school year. The modern history projects include a Reformation Imitation Project, a Speech on Tradition, a Research Paper, and the Hour Project.

The Hour Project is an open-ended final project of the student’s choosing. It should be something that takes a substantial number of hours to complete (they recommend 30-40) and can showcase the talents and interests of the student. Some examples in the teacher guide include copying a famous paintings, making a reproduction of a piece of Victorian furniture, or creating an illustrated children’s book.

 

4 things to love about Modernity

  1. Easy to teach – The course is well-laid out and teacher friendly. It’s divided into daily lessons so it’s very open and go with little to no planning required.
  2. Interesting presentation –  Dave Raymond is excited about history and it shows in his presentation. He’s interesting to listen to. While much of the video is lecture, there is a nice blend of related images mixed with the video of the speaker.
  3. Christian Worldview – There is plenty of opportunity to study history from the politically correct, secular worldview. This class not only teaches history from a Christian perspective, but also provides the Christian perspective of why history is important to study.
  4. Variety – While the format is predictable with 5 daily videos and corresponding readings, the projects and portfolio pages add the opportunity for students to be creative and truly own the content.

If you’re looking for an American History course you can read my review.

Discloser: I received a free download of 8 lessons of Modernity in order to write this review. I was not compensated for this review. All opinions expressed are my own. This post includes affiliate links.

Feb 202016
 

As a new homeschool mom, I wasn’t always confident that I was doing things “right”. Looking back on those early years, I think I pushed too hard sometimes. And then at other times I didn’t push enough. (I tend to swing between extremes.) I wondered if David was reading enough. Was his handwriting too messy? Were we spending enough time doing school? Were we spending too much time? What about math drill?

Enter Anna, child number 2, and I began to feel a little more confident. She was a dream child to homeschool. In kindergarten she would get her own workbooks out and do them herself without me even asking her to. So I pretty much let her. With a difficult to teach older brother and a 3 year old younger brother, it was about all I could do anyway.

Since I didn’t often sit with her watching her work, it took awhile for me to notice that she was holding her pencil incorrectly . It wasn’t horrible, but I was determined to correct it. Since she was left-handed, it was difficult for me to demonstrate a proper grip, so I went to the local education store and purchased a pencil grip that I found there.

I tried to get her to use the pencil grip, but she didn’t like it. I tried to show her how to use it, but I had a very hard time figuring it out myself. We did figure it out, but it felt awkward.  Plus it was hard and uncomfortable. That was pretty much the end of working on her pencil grasp. She’s almost 16 now, her grasp is functional, but her hand gets tired with too much writing.

Recently I received a collection of products from The Pencil Grip, Inc. to review. There are 3 different grip shapes and a child can transition from one grip to the next, allowing his hand to get used to the slightly different position. The grips are soft and more intuitive to hold then the different one we tried 10 years ago.

pencil grip

The 3-Step Grip Training Kit begins with the Crossover Grip (pictured in green on the left). This grip stops fingers from crossing over. Its shape is described as a “Superhero cape” to help encourage children to use the grip.

The next step is the Pinch Grip (in the center). This grip goes a step further and serves as a intermediate point between the crossover grip and the final step which uses the Original Grip.

The Original Grip is suitable for training all children to use the tripod grasp for writing. Using the grip can help prevent the development of bad habits.

All 3 grips can be used by either right handed or left handed children. They can be used to help correct a child with an incorrect grip, or train a young child who is beginning to write to avoid developing a bad habit.

I will be using these with Andrew, my 5 year old, as he begins formal writing lessons this fall. I am also encouraging Anna to see if they help keep her hand from tiring as quickly. I don’t think the Superhero Cape will help encourage her much though.

The Pencil Grip, Inc. sells their products on their website and on Amazon.com. If you’re concerned about the way your child is holding a pencil, I recommend trying them out.

Disclosure: I received a free set of pencil grips in order to write this review. I was not compensated for this post. All opinions expressed are my own. I am not an Occupational Therapist and do not have training in proper pencil grasps.

 

Jul 162015
 

7th Grade Curriculum

Here are our 7th grade curriculum choices. William will be in the 7th grade this year, though he works behind that grade level, so these might be more accurately titled 6th grade curriculum choices. I already have him one grade level behind his age, so I don’t want to move him back further. That is one of the huge benefits to homeschooling! William has several learning issues so I have tried a lot of different curricula and approaches with him. We’ve found some things that work well. We’re still looking in some areas.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through one of the links, I will receive a small commission. 

Math

Christian Light Math 6 – This is one of the things that we have found that works. I have written about William and math before in The Post Where I Admit I was Wrong.

Language Arts

English – Grammar & Composition

Rod & Staff 6 – I am a long time user of Rod & Staff. You can read my review on The Curriculum Choice. I don’t know if this is going to work for William or not. We’ve tried starting it several times before, but struggled. Last year he went through a short unit on parts of speech and he’s been asking questions about what part of speech words are, so he may finally be ready for a more formal study of grammar. We’ll see.

Spelling

All About Spelling 7 – I really cannot rave enough about All About Spelling for William. I can’t say for sure because I was trying a lot of things at once, but it was while we were going through All About Spelling Level 1 that William finally started to understand blending sounds to make words. All About Spelling taught him how to read! I love how simple it is to use. It’s just pick up and go.

Reading & Literature

Kindle books with immersion reading – When you’re reading on a Kindle, it seems less like reading and more like a game. With the immersion reading, William is better able to focus.

Reader’s Theater – This is a new class on SchoolhouseTeachers.com that I am going to use with William this year. It has very simple scripts to read aloud for 2 or more readers. He really needs to work on reading aloud and expression, so this is a super simple way for us to work together on it.

Reading Detective – I purchased this resource a couple of years ago to work on reading comprehension, but he just did not get it. I am going to pull it out again to see if he’s more ready for it now.

Handwriting

Copywork

Bible

God’s Great Covenant: Old Testament 2 – Honestly, this didn’t work that well with William last year. But I’m going to try another year with it to give him more practice with basic reading comprehension. The stories are things he should be familiar with, but we discovered last year that his Bible knowledge has large gaps.

Hymn study – He’ll be studying the same hymns as Lizzie, using them for copywork, and learning to play them on the piano.

Catechism – Memorizing was very difficult for William early on, but he has really made huge strides lately. We’re going to start him working on the Westminster Shorter Catechism.

 

History

Story of the World Volumne 2 – Listen to the audio book and read along

Middle Ages History is a another new course on SchoolhouseTeachers.com. It’s Truthquest History by Michelle Miller, so I’m going to look for additional reading selections for William from this course, especially ones that are available for Kindle.

Geography

Drawing Around the World: USA – William really did well with Drawing Around the World: Europe from Brookdale House last year. I’m sure he’ll enjoy drawing the states just as much, if not more!

Science

Geology – William is very interested in National Parks and one of the geology courses at SchoolhouseTeachers.com is about the different geologic features found in National Parks. He has watched a couple of the video lessons, but I plan on having him work through this complete course for his science class this year.

Electives

William received a camera for his birthday in March. He really loves to take lots of pictures. I’d like to give him a little more training on how to frame a picture and what makes for interesting shots. Right now, he’s a little bit random. This course may be too advanced for him, I need to take a closer look and see if I can condense some of the principles for him.

Jul 132015
 

4th Grade Curriculum Choices

I can’t believe Lizzie is going to be in the 4th grade this year! She is a very bright child who loves to read. For the most part, she likes formal school work, but on some days she has a bad attitude about seat work. The poem about the child with the curl in her forehead has served as a good description of her. Her favorite subjects are Latin and History. I’m trying to changes things this year with more reading aloud together time. Much of what I have planned is a continuation of what we’ve been doing. I have been revisiting the Charlotte Mason philosophy and this year will be a mix of Classical/Charlotte Mason resources.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. If you purchase from one of these links I will receive a small commission.

 

Math

Finish Miquon with Miquon Purple

Move on to Singapore 4A and 4B

Language Arts

Literature

Memoria Press – Finish The Moffats, then Farmer Boy and Charlotte’s Web.

Spelling

All About Spelling Level 4 – I really love this program. It has been wonderful for both my struggling reader and Lizzie who is a natural reader and speller.

English Grammar

Rod & Staff 4 – Diagramming and parts of speech sections only.

Composition

Classical Composition I- Fables – This is new for us. I looked at progymnasmata writing instruction years ago with my oldest, but never implemented it. The program I was looking at was too teacher intensive. I’m going to give this curriculum a try and see how we like it.

Handwriting

Finish New American Cursive then use copywork for more practice.

Bible

God’s Great Covenant: Old Testament 2 – I was very pleased with Old Testament 1 last year, so we’ve decided to continue this series.

Hymn study – I am picking 2 or 3 hymns to study. We’ll use them for copywork, plus learn to play and sing. I haven’t decided if I’ll use the Ambleside Online suggested hymns or select my own.

Catechism memory

Foreign Language

First Form Latin – Lizzie loves Latin and flew through Latina Christiana. We’re giving First Form a try this year, but will move at a relaxed pace.

History

Ambleside Online Year 2 – Here is the big change in the curriculum. I started looking at Ambleside Online again and I have fallen in love. I want to spend time reading together, and this gives us that opportunity. I already own either in print or Kindle format almost all of the resources for the year. I chose Year 2 for the history time period because we’re wrapping up the Ancients. Even though Lizzie is in the 4th grade, many of the resources that are used in Year 2 are used for students much older as well.

Science

Considering God’s Creation – I will use this as the spine but will supplement it heavily with the corresponding Apologia Elementary books. We started this at the end of last year, and Lizzie loved the creative portions of Considering God’s Creation. I like the reading in Apologia better, so I’ve opted to combine them. We’re working through this at a relaxed pace and we don’t do all the activities in the Apologia science books.

I know this looks like a lot, but we usually spend a very short time on each subject. I’ll be putting together a schedule for which subjects to do on which days.
You can find more homeschoolers’ curriculum choices at the Not Back to School Blog Hop.

 

Jun 182015
 

Tapestry of Grace vs Sonlight

Are you trying to decide between Tapestry of Grace and Sonlight? Both programs provide tremendous exposure to literature. In addition, they both integrate history, geography, and Bible and each is written from a Christian perspective. Here are some major items to consider in comparing Sonlight to Tapestry of Grace.

Similarities

Both Tapestry of Grace and Sonlight

  • Present history in the context of a Christian worldview
  • Use Living books. What is a Living book?
  • Include some books that are not Christian
  • Combine history, geography, Bible, and literature studies
  • Have helpful and friendly user forums and excellent customer support
  • Provide curriculum for all ages

Some of the differences between Tapestry of Grace and Sonlight are shown below:

Tapestry of Grace Sonlight
Weekly reading assignments Daily reading assignments
Requires more teacher planning Requires minimal teacher planning
Lampstand Press sells only the TOG year plans. (They don’t sell any books or any materials from other curricular areas such as math, science or grammar). Sonlight is a Complete curriculum provider and sells packages that include the literature books as well as other materials.
Classical curriculum using 4 year chronological history cycle Not classical, can be adapted for chronological history
Strong emphasis on God’s providence through history Great emphasis on missions
Includes extensive ideas for hands-on activities Doesn’t provide specific ideas for hands-on activities
Each year plan can be used for each child up to three times (between 1st grade and 12th grade), but additional books are needed for each level. Each core (year) curriculum package can be used only once per child, but can be reused with younger children
The entire program consists off 4 year-plans covering all of world history 13 different core packages (excluding 2 additional preschool cores) are available.
Entire family can use the same year plan Students close in age can be combined in one core

If you are seeking a history curriculum that integrates other subjects as both Tapestry of Grace and Sonlight do, the choice between these programs is a matter of personal preference. I have specifically NOT provided a list of pros and cons concerning these curricula, because the things that I deem to be positives, might be considered negatives by someone else. I hope this comparison aids you in your decision. Be sure to visit the above links to learn more about these curricula.

Apr 082015
 

Introducing the NEW Educents Marketplace

I just received an email from the founders of Educents, Kate and Kaitlyn, with some really exciting news. Until today, Educents was a website for parents and educators to take advantage of daily deals. But those deals expired… And there were only 50 deals available at once… I wanted saving money to be even EASIER. Kate and Kaitlyn agreed. So they created the new Educents Marketplace. It’s even easier to discover affordable educational resources that make learning FUN!

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Thousands of new products – Educents Sellers can now offer ALL of their bestsellers on the new Educents Marketplace. There’s a wide variety of worksheets, lesson plans, educational apps and toys. Shop The Young Scientists Club, Scholastic, Workman Publishing, Alpha Omega Publishing, Life of Fred books, hundreds of printable units created by educators, and more!

Offers that NEVER expire – Sellers can offer our favorite educational products year-round. Once a deeply discounted Daily Deal expires, you can still find that product available on Educents at the lowest price.

Discovery – It’s easier to search on Educents. Search for your kiddos’ interests like Minecraft or Frozen-inspired resources, and then sort by grade level, subject, brand, and more!

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Follow your favorite brands and Sellers – The “Follow Me” feature lets me add my favorite Sellers to a list. Click the heart on the Seller Storefront. You can also see which Sellers are the most popular with other shoppers!

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The Educents Marketplace is exactly what I want it to be — the best place for parents and educators to find the resources I NEED at an affordable price.

 

 

Feb 122015
 

Save 20% off the Grammar of Poetry Bundle

February 12-14 only!

Use coupon code LOVE20

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. 

Are you like me and already looking for next year’s curriculum? Or maybe you need something new this winter to perk up your homeschool. There’s a special right now on the Grammar of Poetry Bundle from Compass Classroom.

Grammar of Poetry

Grammar of Poetry equips students to capably interact not just with poems, but with language in any situation. It is designed for the 6-9th grade level, but is also appropriate for older children and adults seeking to achieve a better knowledge of how poetry works.

Includes:

  • Activities for each chapter
  • Riddles to solve
  • Glossary of terms
  • 150+ poems to integrate
  • Real-life examples from Shakespeare to tongue twisters

Intended for ages 12+, counted as 1/2 HS Literature credit.

You can see some sample video and even download 3 free lessons at Compass Classroom.

https://vimeo.com/36161476

https://vimeo.com/36161476

Jul 032014
 

It’s summer. We don’t have to do school, right?

Maybe not officially, but I like to make sure we’re still learning. Recently, I’ve had a great opportunity to sneak a little history into my family’s day.

Experience History Through Music

Experience History Through Music

I don’t know if your kids are like mine, but I cannot watch a video or play any song on my computer without everybody running to see what I’m watching or listening to. It can be annoying, but it does have its uses – like if you want them to watch or listen to something. It’s the perfect way to introduce the music portion of Experience History Through Music to unsuspecting children.

Another sneaky thing I like to do is leave interesting books lying around. Especially if they have an interesting cover and photographs on the inside. The saying about not judging a book by its cover is good advice, but a good cover is definitely a plus. That’s how I got my 14 year old daughter to read Musical Memories of Laura Ingalls Wilder from cover to cover without even asking her to. It’s also why I’ve seen my 12 year old son flipping through the books and reading sections from time to time. That works until they disappear into my daughter’s room so she can try out some of the songs on her violin.

 

There are three books in the Experience History Through Music Series:

America – Heart of a New Nation
Westward Ho! – Heart of the Old West
Musical Memories of Laura Ingalls Wilder

Books

I love the format of these books. Each contain a 1-2 page illustrated spread that tells the story behind a song. These stories typically give both specifics about the history of the song, and a more general description of the events in history that the song pertains to. The short length of each segment makes it easy to either very quickly read a small portion, or as time allows, to continue reading multiple sections.

Sheet Music

I also love that the books include simple sheet music for the songs. In our home, my older daughter plays the violin, and my middle son plays the piano. Both are able to (fairly) easily play the music in these books.

CD’s

The accompanying music cd’s are professional, high quality recordings. They are a vitally important part of this study. It seems pointless to study about a song without listening to it! We honestly don’t listen to a lot of music in the house, but these are going to have a rotation in the car once we start back to school with all the short trips we make to classes, lessons, etc.

Content

America – Heart of a New Nation includes many familiar songs like Yankee Doodle, the Star Spangled Banner, and Oh! Susanna. It focuses on the time period beginning at the American Revolution through the Civil War. Westward Ho! has some overlap in time period with America – Heart of a New Nation, but its focus is on songs related to westward expansion like the Oregon Trail, cattle drives, and even sailing songs (Before the railroad, many goods were transported west by sailing around South America). I wasn’t familiar with any of the songs in this volume except for Home on the Range.  Musical Memories of Laura Ingalls Wilder also overlaps the Westward Ho! time period, but it details specific songs and facts related to the life of Laura Ingalls Wilder.

I enjoyed reading all these books, but especially Musical Memories of Laura Ingalls Wilder. I have loved everything Little House on the Prairie since childhood and have a collection of various books and videos about Laura Ingalls Wilder. I have also visited the Laura Ingalls Wilder Museum in Mansfield, Missouri and hope to visit some of the other home sites and museums in the future.

These books would make a fantastic addition to any homeschooler’s library. They could be used to supplement any American History curriculum, as stand-alone unit study spines, or as inviting coffee table books.

The books are $18.99 each and are available at from DianaWaring.com. For the month of July, you can purchase all 3 books for $50.

Don’t miss this fantastic giveaway to celebrate the release of Experience History Through Music. It ends tomorrow!

 

Diana WaringAuthor of Beyond SurvivalReaping the Harvest and Diana Waring’s History Revealed world history curriculum, Diana discovered years ago that “the key to education is relationship.” Beginning in the early ’80s, Diana homeschooled her children through high-school—the real life opportunities to learn how kids learn.  Mentored by educators whose focus was honoring Him who created all learners, and with an international background (born in Germany, university degree in French, lifelong student of world history), Diana cares about how people learn as well as what they learn.  Audiences on four continents have enthusiastically received her energetic speaking style.

 

Disclaimer: I received the complete set of Experience History Through Music in order to write this review. I was not compensated for this review. All opinions expressed are my own.