Jun 272011
 
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Not every homeschooler chooses to homeschool for religious reasons. However, a great many homeschoolers do choose to homeschool so that they can teach their children from a Christian worldview. But after finishing high school, where should a young Christian continue his education if he chooses to do so?

State University?

Community College?

Christian College?

There are plenty of options available. Many Christian parents choose to send their children to secular universities, believing their children have been trained in the faith and are ready to face the worldly influences found there. But others feel that a Christian college is a better choice for their child.  At a Christian college their student will be surrounded by other believers. He will have Christian professors who believe the Bible is the infallible Word of God and who will help to strengthen his faith.

Unfortunately, that is not always the case. In fact, it’s probably less often the case than you think.

What do you think of when you think of Harvard, Yale, and Princeton? Elite private schools? Does anyone still remember that these Ivy League schools were founded on Christian principles? Already Compromised begins with a description of the compromise that led to the secularization of these schools. Are today’s Christian colleges going down the same path?

Ken Ham and Greg Hall with Britt Beemer of America’s Research Group sent surveys to presidents, vice-presidents, religion and science department chairmen at Christian colleges nationwide. These surveys contained a variety of questions like:

Do you believe in the inspiration of Scripture?

Do you believe in the inerrancy of Scripture?


What does your institution teach about the Bible?


Do you believe in God creating the earth in six literal 24-hour days?


The answers, found in Already Compromised, may surprise you.

I cannot say that I was surprised at the percentages of those surveyed who do not believe in a six literal 24-hour days of creation. What was surprising to me was the inconsistency in the survey answers. There were people who answered that they believed the Bible was literally true, but did not believe in a literal interpretation of creation. The book contains many other examples of these inconsistencies.

The book is more than the results of a survey however. It is a call to action. How did we get to this point? What should the church be doing? What questions should we ask before we send our sons and daughters to a Christian college? How should we teach them before they leave? There is even a chapter written directly to the student.

This book has forced me to start thinking about some of the tough decisions we’ll be facing in a few years. Our oldest son is going into the 8th grade. It doesn’t seem like college is that close, but I know that the next 5 years will pass quickly. We’ve spent more of our time worrying about how we’re going to pay for college than thinking about where he should attend. I’ve also got a renewed vision to make sure that my children understand what we believe and why we believe it. This book is a must read if you’re considering Christian colleges for your children.

Disclosure: I received a copy of this book to review from New Leaf Publishing . I was not compensated for this review and all opinions expressed are my own. This post contains an affiliate link.

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  6 Responses to “Already Compromised–by Ken Ham and Greg Hall”

  1. This looks great. I’m gonna have to get some of my reviews up so that I can request this one before it is gone.

    I am stopping by for the scavenger hunt. Found Edna!

  2. I just read “Already Gone.” I’m making sure to use excellent curriculum so my kids have an intellectual grounding in their faith. Ken’s book convinced me of how important this is! My oldest is going into 10th grade, so we’re well on our way here.
    Thanks for the great review – I might get this book too, now.

  3. This is on my “to read” list already, now I want to read it even more!

  4. I have some personal insight and opinion wrt to question of “christian” colleges. In all honesty, I have seen SO much harm come from students who have attended “good” Christian colleges. It’s awful. They have come out religious pharisees who no longer have any regard for their home churches because they aren’t “polished” enough and some come out to detest the worship of God and the movement of the Holy Spirit because they no longer see it as “proper”.

    I have three daughters who we are training to be wives ~ moms ~ keepers at home. We do not plan to send them to college but if they want to go on to higher learning, we will be counseling them to study from home, just as they have for the first 12 years of their schooling. Many colleges now offer distance learning degrees. If we had a son, I would prefer him to go to a local community college and remain in our home and church than I would for him to go off to a christian college. What I have seen come out of them has been nothing short of a nightmare.

    Of course, this is all just my opinion and experience 🙂

    • You’ve raised some valid concerns Karen. Other doctrinal positions, as well as the overall “feel” for the school are important. (I’m struggling for words, it’s early. By “feel” I mean, do the people act like they’ve been saved by grace or are they in bondage to legalism? ) Your choices sound like the right ones for your family.

  5. […] book is a must read if you’re considering Christian colleges for your children.” review by Kristen Hamilton, senior editor for Homeschool Blogger. Discover how these institutions address the cultural […]

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