Jun 062014
 

Homeschool Kindergarten Curriculum

I had the opportunity to talk with a friend at church who will be beginning to homeschool her oldest son for kindergarten this fall.  She was interested in hearing my recommendations for homeschool kindergarten curriculum. In my opinion, kindergarten should be kept simple. For formal school I recommend phonics, handwriting, and math. This conversation occurred several years ago, but I revisited this post and found my recommendations are still the same.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links.

Phonics:

So far I’ve taught 4 kids to read and I’ve used 3 different phonics programs, plus some on-line resources.

Alpha Phonics – This spiral bound book is a simple, no-frills phonics program. The pages are white with handwritten style lettering. The text uses word families to teach reading. For example, the student would learn -at, then add letters to the beginning of -at to make cat, hat, fat, mat, and bat.  In addition to word lists, there are pages with sentences throughout the book. (Read my complete review.)

Phonics Pathways – This is also a simple phonics program.  There are cartoon drawings on many of the pages. This book teaches reading using syllables and spelling patterns. Instead of learning -at with an m in front is mat,  Phonics Pathways begins with teaching the syllable ma- then adding a -t to the end.

Happy Phonics – For William I had to think differently, because he is so different from my older children. First, he wasn’t really overly interested in learning to read. Second, he doesn’t sit still very well. When I tried the first 2 books with him, I couldn’t even get him to focus on the page. After doing a little research, I discovered Happy Phonics. Happy Phonics consists of lots and lots of colorful games, cards, and small booklets to learn phonics. For the first time, I was able to get my son to look at the letters. It definitely requires more teacher prep than the other programs -the program comes printed on cardstock, with all the cutting to be done by the teacher – but it was a worthwhile investment for us. This program uses mainly the word family approach to reading.

Explode the Code – I used this fun workbook program with William in addition to Happy Phonics. I also used Explode the Code with Anna as a supplement to Phonics Pathways and with Lizzie as a supplement to on-line programs. These workbooks provide excellent reinforcement to the phonics concepts being taught in most phonics programs. They have funny line drawings and silly sentences. These books require the student to write. There is also on on-line version available.

Ideally, I would have used either Phonics Pathways or AlphaPhonics with Lizzie. But I never got a chance because she already knew how to read! She did use 2 different on-line programs. I think that she learned to read with those along with her natural readiness to learn. I’ve heard of children teaching themselves to read. I would not go so far as to claim that, but she’s definitely come the closest. She used both Reading Eggs and Reading Kingdom. Links are to my reviews of those programs.

 

Handwriting:

Handwriting without Tears – This is the only handwriting program I’ve ever used for kindergarten. Designed by an occupational therapist, the approach to writing is very logical and sequential. Each letter is broken down into its component parts, and similar letters are learned together. All the capital letters can be written using long lines, short lines, small curves, and large curves. The basic program consists of a workbook and a slate. There are many additional accessories that are available and I’ve added to our collection over the years. I especially liked the wooden letter pieces for William. He used the letter pieces and the letter cards and learned all his letters in about a month.

Math:

Earlybird Kindergarten – I used this math program with William. (Not exactly this version, this is the new U.S. Standards version.) The text contains colorful pictures and is a fun introduction to numbers, counting, shapes, addition, and subtraction. I used the textbooks alone without the teacher’s guide.

Miquon Math – For David, Anna, and Lizzie, I used Miquon Orange for their math curriculum in kindergarten. This is a unique program, that is discovery based. It makes extensive use of Cuisenaire Rods. They all both loved this program. William really loves using the rods, but there are some portions of Miquon that I have found to be too abstract for him.

Miquon Orange is technically a first grade program, but I used it is conjunction with Singapore 1A to ensure that we thoroughly covered beginning concepts before encountering too advanced problems. Using both programs allowed for variety at a slower pace.


Singapore 1A
– Singapore Math is a math program that stresses understanding of mathematical concepts from the beginning. Story problems are introduced early and are very thoroughly taught. I use both the textbook and workbook, but have not invested in the teacher’s guides.

Reading:

Add in a library card and a variety of books, and you have everything you need for kindergarten. Here’s a list of great picture books from the 1000 Good Books list.

But, if I were starting again with my oldest child in kindergarten, I would probably also add Five in a Row. I didn’t use it when we were starting out, but had an opportunity to review it with my younger son this past year. It is a unit study curriculum revolving around terrific picture books for younger children. You can read my complete review here.

May 052014
 

Have you ever wondered if Australia would fit inside the state of Texas? (It doesn’t)

What about Brazil? I’ve always thought it was smaller than the continental US. It turns out it’s very similar in size.

I have just been introduced to a fun geography website: OverlapMaps.com.

OverlapMaps is a very simple, entertaining, and educational website. You select a country, state, river or lake, and then select another geographical area to compare. With a click of the green arrow, a comparison map is generated.

OverlapMaps

Pretty neat, isn’t it?

The use of OverlapMaps is free so go and try it out. I’ll wait.

Fun isn’t it?

The website is free, but if you want to give your students a little direction, I recommend the OverlapMaps.com Activity Sheets. Right now, Educents has a special deal on the sheets. The e-book contains instructions for using OverlapMaps, plus 10 lessons that use OverlapMaps to learn about continents, oceans, countries, and states. It’s a good value at only $4.99. That’s 60% off the regular price!

*Disclosure: This post contains an affiliate link. If you purchase the e-book, I’ll receive a small commission from Educents. 

So what did you find out?

Will Germany fit in the state of Texas?

What’s the largest country that will fit in Alaska?

 

 

Apr 142014
 

As I look back over David’s homeschool career, history has often been a struggle. We started off well, with lots of hands-on projects and notebook pages. He began to use the computer for making notebook pages at a young age (about 2nd grade). We had one year in a co-op for Tapestry of Grace and in hindsight that was a good year. At the time I was often frustrated with the group setting.

Starting in David’s 6th grade year things really started to go downhill in the history department. We focused on reading real books, but we often rushed. I tried to keep all the children together in their history assignments. I was frazzled. Most of the hands-on projects disappeared from our home. Basically the only thing that we managed to slog through was the reading.

With high school coming, I knew that something had to change, so I went in a completely new direction for David. I went with the Textbook – Get It Done Approach for World History. And honestly, there were some things that worked really well with it. The program we used was broken down into daily readings so it was very simple to use. It included comprehension questions, quizzes, and tests. And we made it through.  It did nothing to ignite a love of history though.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. I received a free download of Part 1 in order to write this review. I was not compensated for this post. All opinions expressed are my own.

Next year is American History. I was going to have David use the Textbook – Get It Done Approach again. That is  until I had an opportunity to review Dave Raymond’s American History Curriculum from Compass Classroom.

American History>I am excited to give this curriculum a try. It has some of the features that have worked well for David.

  • Well structured and divided into daily lessons
  • Includes quizzes and tests

But there are some major differences that I am excited about.

Video format

The daily lessons include a relatively short video (about 10 minutes) with Dave Raymond teaching. I think this format will work well for David. He tends to lose focus with lots of reading. I like that Dave Raymond stresses taking notes. That is a skill that David needs to develop before going to college and this will be good practice.

Accompanying readings

The readings are mostly primary source documents that go along with the lecture. They are typically not lengthy. One thing I love about both the student and teacher guide is that the download includes  a pdf version, a Kindle version, and an epub version! So David can read from the Kindle, but I can print things as necessary from the pdf version on my computer. Super idea!

Portfolio and other projects –

This is what I find the most exciting about this curriculum. I feel like we’re coming full circle back to our early days of studying history. (Ones that David actually enjoyed!) Along with the lectures and the reading, the student completes a portfolio of their work. (Similar to the notebook pages we used to do.)It’s described as a scrapbook type of book, but I think we will likely modify it for David and have him create his in electronic form. There are also several other assignments – some of which include a research paper, delivering an historical speech, and the final project called the Hour Project. The options on the Hour Project are limitless, but knowing my son, the project will likely culminate with a video production.

Updated: The curriculum is now available as a whole with 26 lessons. It’s available as a download (regular price $120) or on DVD (current price $120/set). You can also view samples on the Compass Classroom website. To make this a full high school credit, it is necessary to complete the extra projects, however, the curriculum is suitable for upper middle school as well.

 

Feb 202014
 

I’ve always been intrigued by the idea of memorizing large passages of scripture.

But I’ve never been able to do it.

Honestly, I haven’t tried very hard. We have memorized a few chapters of the Bible as a family – Isaiah 53, Luke 2, Psalms 1 and 23 for example, but I haven’t been consistent in personally memorizing.

This year I had made it one of my goals to memorize scripture, so when I was offered a chance to review one of the Bible Memorization Made Easy e-books from Brookdale House, it seemed almost providential.

Disclosure: I was given a free copy of Memorize Galatians in order to write this review. I was not compensated for this review. All opinions expressed are my own. This post contains affiliate links.

Memorize GalatiansI selected the Memorize Galatians book with the initial plan of memorizing along with my family. After I received the e-book, I realized that the format wasn’t going to work for the whole family because it would be too much writing for my younger children. In the end, my almost 14 year old daughter Anna and I are the ones trying out this method. (For now anyway.)

The plan is very straightforward. There are 34 weekly lessons divided into 5 daily lessons per week. Each week covers a manageable portion of Galatians, about 5 verses  depending on the length of the verse. The plan is multi-sensory and has the student read the passage aloud. There is daily copy work of the passage and most days there is a fill in the blank version of the passage. Each day there are different and more words left out. Each week there is a reminder to review the previous weeks’ passages.

OK, confession time. I have started this study, but I have not made it very far into it. I have to say that so far it is easy. It doesn’t take long at all, I just need to be uninterrupted. That unfortunately doesn’t happen very often. Anna is farther along than I am and is enjoying the program. She has mentioned that it seems like almost too much on the weekly passage and that she could memorize it faster. But I think that working on the passage longer will aid in long-term retention. I should mention that she is a very good memorizer. (Much better than I am.) I haven’t found that it is too much on the single passage at all. I think it is about right. Memorize GalatiansAnna also thought there should be a bit more review of past passages than is included. That is easy enough to add though.

Some things to note –

This program utilizes the King James Version of the Bible. Personally, we chose to do all our memory work from KJV anyway because it made sense to us to memorize in a single version and KJV is the “classic” version. It has definitely stood the test of time.

This product is available either in print or e-book. The print costs a bit more, but this is an e-book that MUST be printed, so you should factor that in to your cost. And speaking of printing, you need to print out multiple weeks at a time. Don’t print a single day at a time or you’ll end up ready to work on it and then realize that you need to print and then by the time you print it, that quiet time to work on it has vanished. Ask me how I know this!

I definitely recommend the Bible Memorization Made Easy series. It’s a great way both to study the Bible and to add copy work, memory work, and recitation into your school day.

 

Aug 092013
 

Eleven years ago I attended my very first homeschool book fair. We had a just turned 4 year old boy, a 2 year old girl, and a 2 month old baby. Like many new homeschoolers, I was very enthusiastic about starting homeschooling, and I wanted to go ahead and have a “test” year to make sure that I could actually do it.

Looking back, I see why so many people have the idea or making preschool a test year, but  determining if you’re going to be able to homeschool using a 4 year old as a test subject is not particularly helpful. A lot of growth occurs between 4 and 5. And those younger kids that you’re worrying about keeping entertained  grow a lot in a year too.

Thankfully, we were cheap, poor, frugal so that took a lot of bright, shiny preschool programs out of consideration. That helped me by necessity to keep things simple.

After doing my research, a lot using the CBD Homeschool Catalog, I had determined there was 1 item I was definitely going to buy at the book fair. (Assuming I could find it. Boy did I have no idea what a crazy, big place I was heading into! )

That one thing was Alpha-Phonics.

Alpha-PhonicsAlpha-Phonics is a phonics-based  reading program that has short lessons. It’s a very gentle approach to learning to read using time-proven methods of reading instruction. You teach the sounds the letters make, and you put them together to sound out words. There is repetition, but not long lists of rules to memorize. It doesn’t require writing, which is great for young learners since fine motor skills for writing often lag behind reading readiness. And it is very affordable.

Eleven years ago, we taught David to read using Alpha-Phonics. He was only 4, but he was ready to learn. Anna was not ready to learn to read at 4, or at 5. She was almost 6 before she grasped the concept of blending sounds together to make words. And William was even older. Lizzie however, was another young reader. I didn’t even teach her to read. She learned from several different computer games and her older brother and sister. As a result, she is a little weak on sounding out words. So I’m going to be going through Alpha-Phonics with her to fill in the gaps.

When Alpha-Phonics contacted me to see if I wanted to review their updated program, I couldn’t refuse. The main  Alpha-Phonics text is unchanged from the version I purchased 11 years ago. But they’ve added some extras. In addition to the book, there is now a CD-ROM of the entire text included at the same low price. I’ve tried out the CD, and I liked listening to the author, Samuel L. Blumenfeld, discuss the development of the alphabet and phonics instruction. I think the CD has more value to someone who is using Alpha-Phonics in a classroom setting, but it might prove useful to be able to have the student read from the computer instead of the book just for the sake of variety. It’s not a computer game, it’s full screen images of every lesson in Alpha-Phonics, with teacher instructions, both written and recorded.

I also received the Companion Workbook and the Little Companion Readers.The Companion Workbook has simple exercises to reinforce the concepts learned in the Alpha-Phonics book. The exercises require very little writing so they would be useful for a younger learner. There is a guide that correlates the lessons in the book with the workbook.

The Little Companion Readers are also correlated with the Alpha-Phonics lessons. I have always found phonics readers helpful in those early stages of learning to read. Reading sentences helps with reading comprehension skills and proper voice inflection. It’s nice to have readers specifically linked to your phonics program so you know there are no surprises with letter sounds that haven’t yet been introduced.

I highly recommend Alpha-Phonics for beginning or remedial phonics instruction.

Disclosure: I received a free copy of Alpha-Phonics, the Companion Workbook and Little Companion Readers in order to write this review. I was not compensated for this post. All opinions expressed are my own. This post contains an affiliate link.

Jul 102013
 

A month ago I shared my evaluation of 1st grade with Lizzie.

Today I’m moving on to the next oldest student, William.

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links.

Fifth Grade CurriculumWilliam is 11 years old. He is finishing what I am calling the 4th grade, though technically, according to his age, he should be finishing 5th grade. And according to his achievement tests, he should be somewhere below the 4th grade. But one of the benefits of homeschooling is that I can tailor his subjects, to meet his particular learning challenges.

This year the focus was on math. All the previous years, the focus had been reading. Not that we hadn’t done any math, but what we had done, really hadn’t stuck. So this year I went a new direction in math. I am a fan of conceptual, mastery based math programs. But with William, that just does not work. He would “learn” borrowing, but then the next day it would be brand new. Finally it would seem like he got it, but then when we’d revisit the topic in a couple of weeks, it would be completely forgotten. So that’s why I tried a spiral program this year. I choose Christian Light because of the workbook format and uncluttered pages.

I told about it in The post where I admit I was wrong.

The results were even better than I expected. Since he had to practice some adding, some subtracting, and math facts every single day, they finally “stuck”. This program wasn’t fun and it wasn’t easy, but I am sold on this method for William. Next year for math, it’s Christian Light again!

Another curriculum that I love for William is All About Spelling. I attribute most of William’s reading success to this program, so it’s definitely on the slate for next year too! (Although, I think another big factor was Brain Integration Therapy from Dianne Craft.)

One big weakness that I’ve noticed this year is reading comprehension. I saw it in his math word problems. I noticed it when he read books for book club. So while he is finally able to read in a fairly fluent manner, the meaning of what he is reading is not really getting to his brain. Obviously this is a problem.

I’m floundering a bit with what to do about this. One thing I’m going to work on is narration. We’ve been using the Christian Liberty Press Nature Readers for reading practice. I am going to continue with these, but not stress so much over getting through the whole reading, but instead we’ll stop every paragraph and have him tell me what he just read.

Another resource I’m going to try is Reading Detective. I haven’t tried this yet, so I don’t know if it will be helpful or not, but I have been pleased with other resources from Critical Thinking Company.

Handwriting is also an issue for William. He is able to write neatly, but still struggles with putting the letters on the correct positions above and below the lines. We did some cursive with Handwriting without Tears last year. His cursive looked very nice, but he was unable to write in cursive without a model. He could copy cursive writing, but he couldn’t remember how to form letters without looking. This year I have purchased a Westminster Catechism copybook. My plan is for him to copy, then read what he copied. Hopefully that will help him with learning how to write directly in cursive.

You have probably noticed that I am leaving out content subjects with William. That is because we really are focusing on the 3R’s in formal school time. His history, geography, and science learning comes from his reading various books and watching documentaries. (Though his ability to learn through reading has been limited as I mentioned.) I do hope to include some formal history and science this year, but once again the focus will be on building the foundational skills.

 

Jul 062013
 

I had the opportunity to review the on-line reading program, Reading Eggs, last spring. My daughter Lizzie, really enjoyed the program and played it every day. Since then Reading Eggs has expanded. Now they have Eggy apps! These include Eggy Words, Eggy Alphabet, Eggy Phonics, and more.

I received 2 apps to review:

ipad-eggy_numbers2-6b53bf8b965f7e1bca33c6dcb5e850c3 Eggy Numbers has a variety of activities for young learners. There are multiple accounts allowed so more than one child can keep up with their progress. The activities include both those that teach the number, like drawing and copying,  the number, and those that teach counting.This app is available both for iPad and iPhone and is recommended for children ages 3 and up.

I played with this app and found the menu selection and games fairly intuitive. I did not have any problems with the game running. I liked the wide variety of animals used in the counting games. The graphics are attractive.

We do not have an iPad, so I was using my iPod Touch to review this. I think that although the game works fine on the iPod, the larger screen on an iPad would be better. My 2-1/2 year old son struggled with dragging the farm animals into the pen to count them. But he’s a little under the age recommendation for this app and not really counting yet. He says sequences of numbers, but doesn’t have the “point at one object – say one number” concept down. (I think the technical term is one-to-one correspondence.) Lizzie, 6-1/2, did play with the app and liked it, but the concepts are not ones that she needs practice.

 

ipad-eggynurseryrhymes1-04af70a0ba5912d663600131e1b45546Eggy Nursery Rhymes teaches young children a variety of nursery rhymes and uses the nursery rhymes to practice reading and spelling. Some of the familiar rhymes include Baa Baa Black Sheep, Humpty Dumpty, and Twinkle Twinkle Little Star. In the sing-along view, the bouncing ball shows the words of the nursery rhyme. Then the child can practice spelling various words in the rhyme or choose starting letters of various words in the rhyme.

I liked that the app allows you to select UK, Australian, or US accents. We found the bouncing ball was dragging a little behind the audio, but that is likely a problem with my iPod rather than the app. It’s a 2nd generation, so many of the new apps are pushing its limits. Once again, my kids didn’t match the age and skill levels perfectly. Andrew can watch the sing-along sections, and try to play the games, but he isn’t ready for the spelling exercises. Lizzie also likes the rhymes (and she doesn’t know them all, so it’s good exposure.), but most of the activities are too easy for her. (But she’s a very good reader for 6-1/2 years old.) Overall, these are great apps to have if you have young children. There is a lot of play value for only $2.99 each.

 

Jun 142013
 

We are wrapping up 1st grade for 6 year old Lizzie. It’s been a good year and she has learned a lot. Most of it was very relaxed learning.

Lizzie

I’ve often remarked to my husband that it’s a good thing that God did not give me Lizzie first. If He had, I might be one of those people who gush about how wonderful homeschooling is and how easy it is. But I know that isn’t always so. Boy, do I ever.

But with Lizzie being fourth in line with a couple of very needy kids ahead of her, (Needy in very different ways and for different reasons) it’s a good thing that she is very quick at learning and works well independently. (Mostly) She also is an independent reader which makes a huge difference in the demand for one-on-one instruction.

Here’s the curriculum she used this year.

***This post contains affiliate links. If you make a purchase through one of the links, I will receive a small percentage.

Curriculum-001

Math:

184964: Singapore Math: Primary Math Workbook 1A US Edition

Singapore Math: Primary Math Workbook 1A US Edition By Singaporemath.com Inc

Miquon Red (almost done with this)

These are my favorite elementary math curricula. My oldest 2 children used this combination with great success. It didn’t work well for middle son because it was way too abstract for him.

English/Reading/Literature:

380176: StoryTime Treasures Student GuideStoryTime Treasures Student Guide
By Memoria Press

 

380183: More StoryTime Treasures Student Guide

More StoryTime Treasures Student Guide, By Memoria Press (not quite finished)

This is the first time I have used these books from Memoria Press. I have to say, I love these! I love them even more than I thought I would. I was afraid they would be too work bookish (they are work books after all!), but I found them to have a wide variety of lessons based on classic children’s literature. They teach vocabulary, drawing inferences, basic grammar, elementary literature concepts, and more. I really, really liked them.

Phonics:

146262: Explode the Code, Book 3

Explode the Code, Book 3By Educators Publishing Service

This was a little too easy for her, but she likes workbooks sometimes so this was something that she could work on when she was in a big school mood. Plus, since she learned to read very easily, her phonics skills are a bit weak.

Handwriting:

636135: New American Cursive, Book 1

New American Cursive, Book 1By Iris Hatfield / Memoria Press

I was sold on this in the Memoria Press catalog. I really like the idea of teaching cursive early. It made sense. It didn’t go super well though. This was one that needed a little more one-on-one time.

And that’s it for formal schooling.

No history? No science?

Well, no. Not formally.

I bought a sweet little history book for her,
79900: History For Little PilgrimsHistory For Little PilgrimsBy Christian Liberty Press

We just didn’t get much of it read. But she lives in a house with maps and globes, we bird watch (and all the other animals in the yard), she plays outside, and we hike. Last summer we traveled across the country visiting state capitals along the way. She finds the shapes of states in her chips and crackers. I think she’ll be ok.

What’s on deck for next year?

Mainly more of the same.

We’ll be using the next levels of Singapore and Miquon Math. I’m purchasing the literature guides for 2nd grade from Memoria Press. I am also going to be starting her in Prima Latina. Handwriting I’m still undecided about. I think I want to continue with the New American Cursive. I may add in a print book from Handwriting Without Tears as well.

I am hoping to go actually do some history and science with her next year. She’ll just tag along with whatever I use for her older brother…when I decide on that. And if I figure out how to work it into my day.

 

Apr 262013
 

I’m working on planning next year’s curriculum.

Confession time, I’m almost ALWAYS planning next year’s curriculum. Maybe I should spend more time focusing on THIS year’s?

David is in high school now. I worried and fretted about it for years ahead of time. But actually, it’s been a pretty good year.

Maybe I shouldn’t have worried? Or maybe the worry helped?

I love the freedom of homeschooling. I love being able to select curricula for all of my children and their own unique needs. And while I love the general concept of delight-directed learning, there are certain subjects that we have to teach whether my kids like them or not.

David is a math, science, and computer kid. He really is not into history, social studies, or literature at all. But he still has to study them. On deck for next year is Economics and Civics. I’ve done some searching and I’m not finding a lot that is likely to interest David. (i.e. I think he would hate everything I’ve looked at.)

But “lucky” for me (and David), I discovered Compass Classroom. First, David tried Visual Latin. It started out as a review, but he ended up liking it so much that we switched over to it for Latin II this year! Then in the fall, I enrolled him in Filmmaking from the First Directors. That has been an incredible class for him. It is excellent. (But a lot of work!!!)
Filmmaking

Needless to say, when I got the chance to review another of their products, Economics for Everyone, I jumped at the chance. I have not been disappointed.

Economics for Everyone consists of 12 video lessons and a pdf study guide. The lessons are taught by R.C. Sproul, Jr. and just like everything else from Compass Classroom, they are engaging and fun. These are not videos of R.C. Sproul standing in a classroom, but instead include fun video clips from a wide variety of old movies.

Economics for Everybody | Trailer from Compass Cinema on Vimeo.

 

See what I mean? These lessons bring an often “boring” subject to life with simple explanations and excellent illustrations of economic concepts.

I don’t actually think economics is boring. I even minored in it in college. 

Things to mention:

EconomicsThis course is titled Economics for Everybody, but it is from an unapologetically Christian perspective. The whole foundation of the study is on man’s place in this world and how he was put here by God. I think the “everybody” is referring to the fact that R.C. Sproul, Jr. explains everything so well that “everybody” can understand.

I would not consider this course alone to be sufficient for 1/2 high school credit. However, neither do the publishers and they have included a generous list of additional resources and even suggested texts to accompany the study.

Disclosure: The links to Compass Classroom products are affiliate links. I received a free copy of Economics for Everybody in order to write this review. I was not compensated for this post. Opinions expressed are my own.

Nov 062012
 

When am I ever going to need this?

Why do I have to learn this?

Math is so boring.

If you’ve ever heard any of the above in your home, I have a suggestion for you.

It’s called Make It Real Learning.

I reviewed one of the modules: Sets, Probability, and Statistics from Volume I several years ago. We really enjoyed it!

I recently received the Activity Library: Volume II to review. This volume contains the following 11 books.

    • Make it real learningArithmetic II
    • Fractions, Percents, Decimals III
    • Fractions, Percents, Decimals IV
    • Geometry I
    • Geometry II
    • Graphing & Other Algebra Skills I
    • Graphing & Other Algebra Skills II
    • Linear Functions III
    • Periodic & Piecewise II
    • Quadratic II
    • Sets, Probability, Statistics II

As you can see, many of the topics are continuations of those found in the first volume. However, I do not think it is necessary to have completed Volume I to use Volume II. Volume II adds 2 subjects, Geometry and Graphing, that were not topics in Volume I.

Each of the books contains 10 modules that use a wide variety of real world examples. In Graphing & Other Algebra Skills I, your students can work problems on topics such as autism rates, paper sizes, interest rates, and calculating take home pay. Geometry includes area and volume calculations for swimming pools and landscaping, using right triangles around the house, and so much more. (Maybe this will spark an interest in my son for landscaping! We could certainly use the help.) Each problem set has both student worksheets and a complete solution set.

I think the wide variety of topics make the problems so much more interesting. I’ve enjoyed using these because they always get my son off on some other learning tangent. (OK, I confess that sometimes drives my insane, but in theory I like it.)

The books are only available as e-books, making them to convenient to use and store. Just print the parts that you’re going to use. You can purchase the complete Activity Library Volume II at the Make It Real Learning website for $39.99. There is a special bundled price of $69.99 for both volumes of Make It Real Learning Activity Library. There are also free samples available on their website. I highly recommend taking a look at the samples. I think you’ll be impressed.

Thank you Make It Real Learning for allowing me to review Volume II!

 

Disclosure: I received the Make It Real Learning Activity Library Volume II for free in order to write this review. I was not compensated for this review. All opinions expressed are my own.